Best running Shoes For Posterior Tibial Tendonitis

Best running Shoes For Posterior Tibial Tendonitis

Best Running Shoes For Posterior Tibial Tendonitis

Finding the best shoes for posterior tibial tendonitis can be tough. This is because you are are looking for a shoe with contradicting features in the world today.

It is for this reason that I’ve personally reviewed the top ten running shoes for posterior tibial tendonitis.  And I will also show you how you can identify the right running shoe for you and your condition.

Top Rated Running Shoes For PTTD - 2018

1. Altra Provision 3.0 For Men And Women

BEST ZERO-DROP RUNNING SHOE FOR PTTD

Editor Rating

2. Merrell Trail Blaze Charge

BEST TRAIL RUNNING SHOE FOR PTTD

Editor Rating

3. Brooks Pure Cadence 6 For Men And Women

BEST TRANSITION RUNNING SHOE FOR PTTD

Editor Rating

1. Altra Provision 3.0

Comfort
95%
Durability
100%
Arch Support
95%

The Altra Provision 3.0 is a zero drop running shoe with a naturally formed wide toe-box.

This stability running shoe is another offering by Altra that is perfect for runners with posterior tibial tendonitis.

The outsole comes with footpod technology that offers flexibility while still providing decent stability to the foot.

The mesh upper is breathable with minimal seams which means no hot spots due to stitching. This shoe also comes with a stability wedge that is removable, so for those neutral runners that don’t need a stability running shoe, they can remove the stability wedge from the shoe once their tendon is healed.

This will not only make the shoe lighter, but essentially convert the Altra Provision 3.0 into a neutral zero-drop running shoe. Something all runners might want to move to in the future.

2. Merrell All Out Charge

Comfort
95%
Durability
95%
Arch Support
90%

The Merrell All Out Charge was designed to attack the trail.

This 4 mm drop running shoe is another great trail running shoe for those with posterior tibial tendonitis.

This is a lightweight and highly breathable running shoe.

The outsole on this shoe is excellent and provides superior grip in wet and muddy conditions.

The deep circular stacked lugs are widely spaced and release mud easily. The key features being stability, comfort, protection and grip.

The wide toe-box allows your toes to splay with every step you take. Thus redistributing pressure more evenly throughout the feet and reducing pressure on the tendon.

Merrell’s own Unifly technology offers two impact protection zones at the heel and the forefoot areas of the footbed. This offers ample impact protection when landing.

This is a tried and tested favorite in Merrell’s trail running shoe line up. It comes in a waterproof as well as a non-waterproof version and can be used for both walking and hiking as well.

3. Brooks Pure Cadence 6

Comfort
100%
Durability
90%
Arch Support
90%

http://www.thesewisefeet.com/best-running-shoes-flat-feet/The Brooks Pure Cadence 6 is one of Brooks’ few lightweight running shoes. Brooks is a household name when it comes to stability running shoes. Although their shoes are known to be heavy, bulky runners.

The Brooks Cadence 6 is none of that. The shoe provides it’s support through a flexible guide rail system that’s seamlessly incorporated into the shoe. This helps support the arch of your foot, while allowing the shoe to be extremely lightweight.

The 4 mm heal drop makes this one of the best running shoes for posterior tibial tendonitis. As it is hard to find shoes that offer zero-drop whilst still providing good arch support.

The upper is made of a new mesh material for extra breathability. Along with 3D overlays, they provide a seamless stable foot wrap.

The added benefit to this shoe is the removable foot-bed which can be swapped for a more aggressive arch support insole.

I like the Brooks Pure Cadence 6 for posterior tibial tendonitis because: It is a lightweight running shoe with a low drop, decent arch support and a removable insole.

4. Hoka One One Gaviota

Comfort
95%
Durability
100%
Arch Support
90%

The Hoka One One Gaviota is a stability running shoe designed for those who overpronate.

This is what makes it one of the best running shoes for posterior tibial tendonitis.

The built in arch support takes a lot of the pressure away from the posterior tibial tendon, allowing it to ample time to heal and recover. This is one of the plushest running shoes on the market that provide ample arch support for overpronators.

The only knock on this shoe is that it is heavy on the feet, but it’s unmatched comfort in the stability department makes is one of the best running shoes for PTTD.

The J-frame technology on the bottom of the shoe provides the support needed for the foot to stay in a neutral position. While the thick rubber padding on the bottom is extremely wear resistant at the same time.

The heel counter is deep and locks your foot into place providing ample confidence on the road.

The Hoka One One Gaviota is also extremely durable and will last many a mile.

The cushioning and arch support on the Hoka Gaviota are make it an excellent long distance running shoe for those with posterior tibial tendonitis.

5. Hoka One One Constant 2

Comfort
95%
Durability
95%
Arch Support
90%

The Hoka One One Constant 2 is a daily long distance running shoe for overpronators.

The dual-density midsole provides excellent amounts of arch support and cushioning. The cushioning on Hoka’s shoes are some of the best in the world, this is due to the oversized midsoles they place on their shoes.

This makes the Constant 2 one of the most comfortable stability running shoes on the market.

The 4 mm heel-to-toe drop means that you won’t be placing too much stress on your arches, which in turn will help the posterior tibial tendon to relax.

The toe box on this shoe is also wide and allows you enough wiggle room for your toes.

Wide-toe boxes help redistribute pressure further away from any one concentrated location, making the toes bear the load equally.

This will also remove any remaining stress from the tendon, thus giving it more time to heal.

6. Altra Impulse Flash

Comfort
95%
Durability
85%
Arch Support
95%

The Altra Impuse Flash is one of those rare shoes that were made specifically for those with posterior tibial tendonitis.

This is because it is one of the few zero drop shoes on the market that have stability control built-in. The cushioning on this shoe is moderate.

The one slight issue with these shoes is that they don’t breathe as well as the Brooks Cadence, so you feet will run slightly hotter than mesh or knitted upper running shoes.

This is because of the ultra reflective upper material that reflects light in the dark, making the shoe ultra visible at night.

This makes the Altra Impulse Flash ideal for walking, running or biking at night.

Altra’s footpod technology on the out-sole, maps the bones and tendons of the feet. This helps the shoe remain flexible at the ball of the foot, whilst providing ample stability under the arch.

The arch stability and zero heel-to-toe drop make the Altra Impulse an excellent choice for those with PTTD.

And if you are into flashy colors, you’re going to love this shoe’s ultra reflective upper.

7. Hoka One One Conquest 2

Comfort
95%
Durability
95%
Arch support
85%

The Hoka One One Conquest 2 is a low drop shoe coming in with a heel to toe differential of 4 mm.

This is a highly cushioned shoe that is relatively lightweight for the amount of cushioning added to it.

The upper of the Conquest is made from a seamless no-sew construction. This helps reduce hot spots, otherwise created by stitching on the shoe.

This lightweight mesh upper is also extremely breathable and relatively resistant to water.

The Hoka One One Conquest also comes with a water drainage system that’s going to keep the shoe relatively dry and lightweight whether you’re training in the rain or in the snow.

The outsole is made of high abrasion rubber that is excellent at gripping pavement or dry rocky terrain.

The Hoka One One Conquest is an excellent road shoe for running long distances. This is because thee heavy cushioning is perfect for longer races when your feet need more padding as they get fatigued.

You will need to get a more aggressive insole to support your arch when wearing this shoe.

8. La Sportiva Bushido

Comfort
90%
Durability
100%
Arch Support
90%

Now who’s going to complain about a running shoe known as the Bushido.

The La Sportiva Bushido is truly a warrior in its own right.

This is a low to medium weight trail running shoe that can take a beating and still keep going.

The outsole is made of a sticky rubber material that provides excellent tread on the trail.

What is great about this offering is that it is a relatively low drop stability trail running shoe.

The TPU cradle under the arch of the foot, provides aggressive arch support and you won’t have to replace the insole on this shoe for another arch supporting orthotic.

The toe pad at the front of the shoe extends all the way from side to side. This provides ample padding for your toes when on the trail.

This is a very durable shoe that is excellent for trail runners with pttd.

This shoe has a higher heel-to-toe drop than I would usually recommend. As the heel-to-toe offset comes in at around 6 mm, but it is a good transition shoe for those of you coming fro 12mm drops or more.

9. New Balance Fresh Foam 1080 V7

Comfort
100%
Durability
95%
Arch Support
95%

The New Balance Fresh Foam Vongo challenges the way people think about stability shoes. The shoe has spent more than 2 years in the design stage, with plenty of testing under it’s belt.

This shoe harnesses a lot of innovative technology in order to provide excellent stability in a compact lightweight support.

The midsole is made of a lightweight material that is overstuffed under the arch of the foot. This adds support to the medial part of the shoe, thus giving the posterior tibial tendon enough relief.

The upper is made of a seamless mesh material. This drastically reduced chaffing and hot spots created by the stitching as in other shoes.

The outsole is also separated down the center. This reduces overpronation during walking with heel strike.

Also, the 4 mm heel-to-toe offset helps with redistributing weight more evenly throughout the foot. Thus reducing strain on the posterior tibial tendon.

The New Balance Vongo is one of the best running shoes for PTTD.

10. Saucony Liberty ISO

Comfort
95%
Durability
80%
Arch Support
80%

The Saucony Liberty ISO is a responsive running shoe with just a hint of arch support.

This is a running shoe that is excellent for longer runs or daily training.

The Liberty ISO is an alternative to the already popular Freedom ISO.

It offers arch support for mild overpronators.

The mesh upper provides a sock-like feel that offers excellent comfort and breathablitiy.

The 4 mm heel-to-toe drop makes the shoe good for posterior tibial tendonitis.

This set-up offers a more even weight distribution to the feet, taking away excess loading or stress placed on the tendon.

While not the best shoe on this list, due to its minimal arch support. Replacing the insole with an insole for flat feet will give the posterior tibial tendon enough support.

The advantage being; after the tendon heals, removing the insole leaves you with an excellent neutral running.

How To Choose The Best Running Shoes For Posterior Tibial Tendonitis 

The dilemma for those with posterior tibial tendonitis is; you need arch support as much as you need a zero drop shoe. These 2 features are extremely difficult to find because they contradict each other in the running shoe world.

The running world is divided into minimalist, maximalist and conventional running shoes. These 3 warring factions don’t seem to want to give up on their idea of the best running shoe and stick to their ideology’s features.

Luckily, there are a couple of running shoes that have a mix of these features, which I have mentioned above.

And depending on whether the arch support is not enough or if the heel to toe drop is too much, they all come with removable insoles. Allowing you to make tweaks based on your personal foot shape.

Why Do You Need Arch Support As well As A Zero heel-To-toe Drop For Posterior Tibial Tendonitis?

The reason for the arch suport is; the posterior tibial tendon does a lot to pull up the arch of the foot. This strains the tendon causing further inflammation.

And when it comes to recovering from posterior tibial tendonitis, inflammation reduction is the name of the game.

Hence supporting the arch with the right shoe and orthotic will take away much of the work the posterior tendon has to perfrom. Thus, giving it ample time to rest and recover.

The problem with this combination is that there are not many shoes out there that offer a zero heel-to-toe drop while providing proper arch support.

The best option would be to go for a zero drop shoe and to switch out the insole for an aggressive arch support insole.

It is important to note that the most important feature for running shoes for posterior tibial tendonitis is arch support. So If the arch support on any of these shoes aren’t enough, make sure to swap the insole out for an insole with aggressive arch support.

You can find reviews on insoles for arch support in my article on the best insoles for flat feet.

Conclusion

Even though several running shoes come with a zero heel-to-toe drop and many come with arch support. There aren’t too many running shoes out there with these two features perfectly combined.

The running shoes mentioned above are the best running shoes for posterior tibial tendonitis. They have all the right features to aid in a quick and speedy recovery, especially when combined with posterior tibial tendonitis taping.

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